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dc.creatorBlanco Vaca, Juan Antonioes_ES
dc.creatorDubois, Davides_ES
dc.creatorLittlejohn, Dalees_ES
dc.creatorFlanders, David N.es_ES
dc.creatorRobinson, Peteres_ES
dc.creatorMoshofsky, Mollyes_ES
dc.creatorWelham, Clivees_ES
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-30T10:02:12Z
dc.date.available2016-06-20T23:00:15Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.issn0361-5995 (Print)
dc.identifier.issn1435-0661 (Electronic)
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2454/19813
dc.descriptionThis work was presented at the “North America Forest Soils Conference, Montana 2013”, in the “New Technologies in Soil Research” session.en
dc.descriptionIncluye material complementarioes_ES
dc.description.abstractMany rural communities in British Columbia (western Canada) are increasingly at risk from wildfire as temperatures rise and droughts become more frequent. In addition, these communities are also faced with rising fuel costs, and a growing demand for heat as their populations increase. The fact these communities are surrounded by forests presents an opportunity to combine community wildfire risk abatement with bioenergy development. Here we show how the ecological model FORECAST was linked with GIS and economic models to create a freely available on-line tool (FIRST Heat) to help other communities make their own screening-level ecological assessments of combining wildfire risk control with district heating systems. The tool incorporates an ecological sustainability index based on the relative change in soil organic matter (SOM) after 50 years of management compared to initial levels. Two thresholds were defined: 10% SOM lost as “warning” level, and 20% SOM lost as “critical” level. The tool was able to adequately capture the influences of ecological zone, stand age, site quality, and intensity of forest management on SOM losses. Stands in the sub-boreal and arid interior were significantly more exposed to SOM losses than in other ecological zones, as well as soils in old-growth forests. Stands in poor sites were significantly more sensitive to forest management than young and fertile sites. All things considered, our results show the suitability of incorporating ecological models and SOM thresholds in user-friendly decision-support tools to successfully transfer scientific knowledge on forest soils to local stakeholders and decision makers.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/zipen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.publisherThe Soil Science Society of America, Inc.en
dc.relation.ispartofSoil Science Society of America Journal, 78(S1): S105-S117en
dc.rights© Soil Science Society of America, 5585 Guilford Rd., Madison WI 53711 USA All rights reserved. No part of this periodical may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Permission for printing and for reprinting the material contained herein has been obtained by the publisher (Versión del editor)en
dc.rightsCC Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)en
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subjectForest biomassen
dc.subjectEcological modelen
dc.subjectSustainable energyen
dc.subjectGreen economyen
dc.subjectSustainable forest managementen
dc.subjectClimate change mitigationen
dc.subjectFIRST Heaten
dc.titleSoil organic matter: a sustainability indicator for wildfire control and bioenergy production in the urban/forest interface.en
dc.typeArtículo / Artikuluaes
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversidad Pública de Navarra. Departamento de Ciencias del Medio Naturales_ES
dc.contributor.departmentNafarroako Unibertsitate Publikoa. Natura Ingurunearen Zientziak Sailaeu
dc.rights.accessRightsAcceso abierto / Sarbide irekiaes
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen
dc.embargo.terms2016-02-18
dc.identifier.doi10.2136/sssaj2013.06.0214nafsc
dc.relation.publisherversionhttps://dx.doi.org/10.2136/sssaj2013.06.0214nafsc
dc.type.versionVersión aceptada / Onetsi den bertsioaes
dc.type.versioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/acceptedVersionen


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© Soil Science Society of America, 5585 Guilford Rd., Madison WI 53711 USA
All rights reserved. No part of this periodical may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by
any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or any information storage
and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Permission for printing and for
reprinting the material contained herein has been obtained by the publisher (Versión del editor)
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © Soil Science Society of America, 5585 Guilford Rd., Madison WI 53711 USA All rights reserved. No part of this periodical may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Permission for printing and for reprinting the material contained herein has been obtained by the publisher (Versión del editor)