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dc.creatorSoto de León, Saraes_ES
dc.creatorCamargo, Milenaes_ES
dc.creatorSánchez, Ricardoes_ES
dc.creatorMuñoz, Marinaes_ES
dc.creatorPérez Prados, Antonioes_ES
dc.creatorPurroy Unanua, Antonioes_ES
dc.creatorPatarroyo, Manuel Elkines_ES
dc.creatorPatarroyo, Manuel Alfonsoes_ES
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-29T08:11:48Z
dc.date.available2014-05-29T08:11:48Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203 (Electronic)
dc.identifier.other589
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2454/10651
dc.description.abstractBackground: Infection with multiple types of human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the main risk factors associated with the development of cervical lesions. In this study, cervical samples collected from 1, 810 women with diverse sociocultural backgrounds, who attended to their cervical screening program in different geographical regions of Colombia, were examined for the presence of cervical lesions and HPV by Papanicolau testing and DNA PCR detection, respectively. Principal Findings: The negative binomial distribution model used in this study showed differences between the observed and expected values within some risk factor categories analyzed. Particularly in the case of single infection and coinfection with more than 4 HPV types, observed frequencies were smaller than expected, while the number of women infected with 2 to 4 viral types were higher than expected. Data analysis according to a negative binomial regression showed an increase in the risk of acquiring more HPV types in women who were of indigenous ethnicity (+37.8%), while this risk decreased in women who had given birth more than 4 times (-31.1%), or were of mestizo (-24.6%) or black (-40.9%) ethnicity. Conclusions: According to a theoretical probability distribution, the observed number of women having either a single infection or more than 4 viral types was smaller than expected, while for those infected with 2-4 HPV types it was larger than expected. Taking into account that this study showed a higher HPV coinfection rate in the indigenous ethnicity, the role of underlying factors should be assessed in detail in future studies.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis project was funded by Asociacion Investigacion Solidaria SADAR, Caja Navarra (Navarra, Spain) and the Spanish Agency for International Development Cooperation (AECID) (Project 08-CAP2-0609).en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen
dc.relation.ispartofPlos One, 2011, 6(2): e14705en
dc.rights© 2011 Soto-De Leon et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
dc.subjectInvasive cervical canceren
dc.subjectHPV infectionen
dc.subjectGenetic susceptibilityen
dc.subjectUniversity studentsen
dc.subjectAfrican americanen
dc.subjectPCR detectionen
dc.subjectPrimer setsen
dc.subjectWomenen
dc.subjectEpidemiologyen
dc.subjectPrevalenceen
dc.titleDistribution patterns of infection with multiple types of human papillomaviruses and their association with risk factorsen
dc.typeArtículo / Artikuluaes
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articleen
dc.contributor.affiliationNafarroako Unibertsitate Publikoa. Matematika Sailaeu
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversidad Pública de Navarra. Departamento de Matemáticases_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsAcceso abierto / Sarbide irekiaes
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0014705
dc.relation.publisherversionhttps://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0014705
dc.type.versionVersión publicada / Argitaratu den bertsioaes
dc.type.versioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersionen


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© 2011 Soto-De Leon et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits
unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2011 Soto-De Leon et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.