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dc.creatorBarriuso Lapresa, Lauraes_ES
dc.creatorMiqueleiz Autor, Estrellaes_ES
dc.creatorAlbaladejo, Romanaes_ES
dc.creatorVillanueva Orbaiz, Rosaes_ES
dc.creatorSantos, Juana M.es_ES
dc.creatorRegidor Poyatos, Enriquees_ES
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-10T13:16:36Z
dc.date.available2016-02-10T13:16:36Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn1471-2431 (Print)
dc.identifier.issn1471-2431 (Electronic)
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2454/20013
dc.descriptionIncluye material complementarioes_ES
dc.description.abstractBackground: Childhood obesity is a major problem in rich countries due to its high prevalence and its harmful health consequences. An exploratory analysis conducted in the PubMed database highlighted that the number of papers published on the relationship between socioeconomic position (SEP) and childhood-adolescent weight status had risen substantially with respect to an earlier review which had covered the period 1990–2005. Methods: To describe the findings on the relationship between SEP and childhood-adolescent weight status in papers published in rich countries from 1990 through 2013, studies were identified in the following databases: PubMed; Web of Knowledge (WOK); PsycINFO; Global Health; and Embase. We included observational studies from the 27 richest OECD countries, which covered study populations aged 0 to 21 years, and used parental education, income and/or occupation as family SEP indicators. A total of 158 papers met the inclusion criteria and reported 134 bivariable and 90 multivariable analyses. Results: Examination of the results yielded by the bivariable analyses showed that 60.4 % of studies found an inverse relationship, 18.7 % of studies did not found relationship, and 20.9 % of studies found a relationship that varied depending on another variable, such as age, sex or ethnic group; the corresponding percentages in the multivariable analyses were 51.1, 20.0 and 27.8 %, respectively. Furthermore, 1.1 % found a positive relationship. Conclusion: The relationship between SEP and childhood-adolescent weight status in rich countries is predominantly inverse and the positive relationship almost has disappeared. The SEP indicator that yields the highest proportion of inverse relationships is parents’ education. The proportion of inverse relationships is higher when the weight status is reported by parents instead using objective measurements.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was conducted thanks to support from the Research Project PI11/00784 “Socioeconomic context of residence area and overweight and obesity childhood” financed by the Ministry of Science and Innovation.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/zipen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Pediatrics (2015) 15:129en
dc.rightsThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://​creativecommons.​org/​licenses/​by/​4.​0/​), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://​creativecommons.​org/​publicdomain/​zero/​1.​0/​) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/
dc.subjectChildhood obesityen
dc.subjectSocioeconomic positionen
dc.subjectSystematic reviewen
dc.subjectRich countriesen
dc.titleSocioeconomic position and childhood-adolescent weight status in rich countries: a systematic review, 1990–2013en
dc.typeArtículo / Artikuluaes
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversidad Pública de Navarra. Departamento de Sociologíaes_ES
dc.contributor.departmentNafarroako Unibertsitate Publikoa. Soziologia Sailaeu
dc.rights.accessRightsAcceso abierto / Sarbide irekiaes
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12887-015-0443-3
dc.relation.publisherversionhttps://doi.org/10.1186/s12887-015-0443-3
dc.type.versionVersión publicada / Argitaratu den bertsioaes
dc.type.versioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersionen


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This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://​creativecommons.​org/​licenses/​by/​4.​0/​), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://​creativecommons.​org/​publicdomain/​zero/​1.​0/​) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://​creativecommons.​org/​licenses/​by/​4.​0/​), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://​creativecommons.​org/​publicdomain/​zero/​1.​0/​) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.