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dc.creatorSelva, Lauraes_ES
dc.creatorViana, Davides_ES
dc.creatorRegev Yochay, Gilies_ES
dc.creatorTrzcinski, Krzysztofes_ES
dc.creatorCorpa, Juan Manueles_ES
dc.creatorLasa Uzcudun, Íñigoes_ES
dc.creatorNovick, Richard P.es_ES
dc.creatorPenadés, José R.es_ES
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-28T09:14:03Z
dc.date.available2018-12-28T09:14:03Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.issn0027-8424 (Print)
dc.identifier.issn1091-6490 (Electronic)
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2454/31883
dc.description.abstractA surprising example of interspecies competition is the production by certain bacteria of hydrogen peroxide at concentrations that are lethal for others. A case in point is the displacement of Staphylococcus aureus by Streptococcus pneumoniae in the nasopharynx, which is of considerable clinical significance. How it is accomplished, however, has been a great mystery, because H2O2 is a very well known disinfectant whose lethality is largely due to the production of hyperoxides through the abiological Fenton reaction. In this report, we have solved the mystery by showing that H2O2 at the concentrations typically produced by pneumococci kills lysogenic but not nonlysogenic staphylococci by inducing the SOS response. The SOS response, a stress response to DNA damage, not only invokes DNA repair mechanisms but also induces resident prophages, and the resulting lysis is responsible for H2O2 lethality. Because the vast majority of S. aureus strains are lysogenic, the production of H2O2 is a very widely effective antistaphylococcal strategy. Pneumococci, however, which are also commonly lysogenic and undergo SOS induction in response to DNA-damaging agents such as mitomycin C, are not SOS-induced on exposure to H2O2. This is apparently because they are resistant to the DNAdamaging effects of the Fenton reaction. The production of an SOS-inducing signal to activate prophages in neighboring organisms is thus a rather unique competitive strategy, which we suggest may be in widespread use for bacterial interference. However, this strategy has as a by-product the release of active phage, which can potentially spread mobile genetic elements carrying virulence genes.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by Comisión Interministerial de Ciencia y Tecnología Grants BIO2005-08399-C02-02, BIO2008-05284-C02-02, and BIO2008-00642-E/C; Cardenal Herrera-CEU University Grants PRCEUUCH25/ 08 and Copernicus program; and by Conselleria de Agricultura, Pesca i Alimentació (CAPiA), and from the Generalitat Valenciana (ACOMP07/258) (J.R.P.). L.S. and D.V. were supported by Cardenal Herrera-CEU University fellowships.en
dc.format.extent5 p.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/zipen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.publisherNational Academy of Sciencesen
dc.relation.ispartofPNAS, January 27, 2009 106 (4) 1234-1238en
dc.rights© 2009 by The National Academy of Sciences of the USAen
dc.subjectHydrogen peroxideen
dc.subjectSOS responseen
dc.subjectStaphylococcus aureusen
dc.subjectStreptococcus pneumoniaeen
dc.subjectBacterial interferenceen
dc.titleKilling niche competitors by remote-control bacteriophage inductionen
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articleen
dc.typeArtículo / Artikuluaes
dc.contributor.departmentIdAB - Instituto de Agrobiotecnología / Agrobioteknologiako Institutuaes
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen
dc.rights.accessRightsAcceso abierto / Sarbide irekiaes
dc.identifier.doi10.1073/pnas.0809600106
dc.relation.publisherversionhttps://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0809600106
dc.type.versioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersionen
dc.type.versionVersión publicada / Argitaratu den bertsioaes


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