Show simple item record

dc.creatorMerino, Nekanees_ES
dc.creatorToledo Arana, Alejandroes_ES
dc.creatorVergara Irigaray, Martaes_ES
dc.creatorValle Turrillas, Jaionees_ES
dc.creatorSolano Goñi, Cristinaes_ES
dc.creatorCalvo, Enriquees_ES
dc.creatorLopez, Juan Antonioes_ES
dc.creatorFoster, Timothy J.es_ES
dc.creatorPenadés, José R.es_ES
dc.creatorLasa Uzcudun, Íñigoes_ES
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-23T11:16:21Z
dc.date.available2019-01-23T11:16:21Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.issn0021-9193(Print)
dc.identifier.issn1098-5530 (Electronic)
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2454/32086
dc.description.abstractThe capacity of Staphylococcus aureus to form biofilms on host tissues and implanted medical devices is one of the major virulence traits underlying persistent and chronic infections. The matrix in which S. aureus cells are encased in a biofilm often consists of the polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA) or poly-N-acetyl glucosamine (PNAG). However, surface proteins capable of promoting biofilm development in the absence of PIA/PNAG exopolysaccharide have been described. Here, we used two-dimensional nano-liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry to investigate the composition of a proteinaceous biofilm matrix and identified protein A (spa) as an essential component of the biofilm; protein A induced bacterial aggregation in liquid medium and biofilm formation under standing and flow conditions. Exogenous addition of synthetic protein A or supernatants containing secreted protein A to growth media induced biofilm development, indicating that protein A can promote biofilm development without being covalently anchored to the cell wall. Protein A-mediated biofilm formation was completely inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by addition of serum, purified immunoglobulin G, or anti-protein A-specific antibodies. A murine model of subcutaneous catheter infection unveiled a significant role for protein A in the development of biofilm-associated infections, as the amount of protein A-deficient bacteria recovered from the catheter was significantly lower than that of wild-type bacteria when both strains were used to coinfect the implanted medical device. Our results suggest a novel role for protein A complementary to its known capacity to interact with multiple immunologically important eukaryotic receptors.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by the BIO2005-08399 and ERA-Net pathogenomics GEN2006-27792-C2-1-E/PAT grants from the Spanish Ministerio de Educación y Ciencia and grant LSHM-CT-2006-019064 from the European Union.en
dc.format.extent12 p.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Microbiologyen
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Bacteriology, vol. 191, nº 3, feb. 2009, p. 832–843en
dc.rights© 2009, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.en
dc.subjectStaphylococcus aureusen
dc.subjectStaphylococcal proteinen
dc.subjectMulticellular behavioren
dc.subjectBiofilmsen
dc.titleProtein A-mediated multicellular behavior in Staphylococcus aureusen
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articleen
dc.typeArtículo / Artikuluaes
dc.contributor.departmentIdAB – Instituto de Agrobiotecnología / Agrobioteknologiako Institutuaes
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen
dc.rights.accessRightsAcceso abierto / Sarbide irekiaes
dc.identifier.doi10.1128/jb.01222-08
dc.relation.publisherversionhttps://doi.org/10.1128/jb.01222-08
dc.type.versioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersionen
dc.type.versionVersión publicada / Argitaratu den bertsioaes


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record