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dc.creatorÁlvarez, Cristianes_ES
dc.creatorRamírez Campillo, Rodrigoes_ES
dc.creatorCristi Montero, Carloses_ES
dc.creatorRamírez Vélez, Robinsones_ES
dc.creatorIzquierdo Redín, Mikeles_ES
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-17T12:13:07Z
dc.date.available2019-07-17T12:13:07Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn1664-042X
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2454/33582
dc.description.abstractBackground: Exercise is known to improve cardiometabolic outcomes; however, results are typically reported as mean values, and there is wide interindividual variability in terms of response that has not been explored in populations at risk for hypertension. Our aim was to investigate both the effects on and the prevalence of non-responders (NRs) for decreasing blood pressure (BP) and other risk factors among prehypertensive women after long-term high-intensity interval training (HIIT). A secondary aim was to report potential variables that can predict decreases in BP after HIIT. Methods: Sedentary overweight/obese women (age 35.9 ± 5.4 year; body mass index [BMI] 30.9 ± 6.2 kg/m2) were assigned to a prehypertensive (PreHTN; N = 44) or normotensive (NT; N = 40) group according to their ambulatory BP at baseline. Subjects underwent a thrice-weekly 16-week HIIT program (7-10 × 1 min exercise with 2 min of rest). Training-induced changes in body composition and cardiovascular, metabolic, strength, and endurance performance markers were measured, and the prevalence of NRs was reported as a percentage. All outcomes were analyzed by multivariable regression. Results: Statistically significant (P < 0.05) decreases in systolic BP (SBP) were detected in the PreHTN group (Δ -8 mmHg) compared with baseline, whereas the NT group (Δ + 3 mmHg) showed a non-significant increase in SBP. Diastolic BP (DBP) was significantly decreased in the PreHTN group (Δ -5.8 mmHg) and non-significantly decreased (Δ -2 mmHg) in the NT group. Also, there were significant differences (P < 0.0001) in the prevalence of NRs based on SBP between the PreHTN and NT groups (11.4 vs. 68.8%), but similar prevalence of NRs based on DBP. SBP alone was a powerful predictive factor for a beneficial SBP reduction, explaining 51.2% of the results, which was similar to other more complex models tested. Conclusion: The prevalence of NRs based on SBP and DBP was different between prehypertensive and normotensive subjects after 16 weeks of HIIT. Other comorbidities such as body composition and metabolic outcomes showed almost similar modifications between prehypertensive and normotensive subjects, being the most basic predictive factor for BP reduction baseline SBP, which we refer to as 'BP health status' (51.2%). This improvement in BP was accompanied by other known improvements of HIIT on body composition, metabolic and endurance performance in both study cohorts.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe present research project was funded by grants from the Family Healthcare Center Tomás Rojas and with public funding from the Health Service of Los Ríos by the Health promotion program of the 2014. MI was funded by research grants RD12/043/0002 [Spanish Net on Aging and frailty; (RETICEF)] (ISCIII and fondos FEDER), PI17/01814 and CIBER de Fragilidad y Envejecimiento Saludable (CIBERFES).en
dc.format.extent13 p.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.publisherFrontiers Mediaen
dc.relation.ispartofFrontiers in Physiology, 9:1443en
dc.rights© 2018 Álvarez, Ramírez-Campillo, Cristi-Montero, Ramírez-Vélez and Izquierdo. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectHigh-intensity interval trainingen
dc.subjectNon-respondersen
dc.subjectPrehypertensionen
dc.subjectRespondersen
dc.subjectRisk factorsen
dc.subjectSystolic blood pressureen
dc.subjectWomenen
dc.titlePrevalence of non-responders for blood pressure and cardiometabolic risk factors among prehypertensive women after long-term high-intensity interval trainingen
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articleen
dc.typeArtículo / Artikuluaes
dc.contributor.departmentUniversidad Pública de Navarra. Departamento de Ciencias de la Saludes_ES
dc.contributor.departmentNafarroako Unibertsitate Publikoa. Osasun Zientziak Sailaeu
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen
dc.rights.accessRightsAcceso abierto / Sarbide irekiaes
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fphys.2018.01443
dc.relation.publisherversionhttps://doi.org/10.3389/fphys.2018.01443
dc.type.versioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersionen
dc.type.versionVersión publicada / Argitaratu den bertsioaes


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© 2018 Álvarez, Ramírez-Campillo, Cristi-Montero, Ramírez-Vélez and
Izquierdo. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative
Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in
other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s)
are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance
with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted
which does not comply with these terms.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2018 Álvarez, Ramírez-Campillo, Cristi-Montero, Ramírez-Vélez and Izquierdo. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.