Show simple item record

dc.creatorMarino Bilbao, Danieles_ES
dc.creatorAriz, Idoiaes_ES
dc.creatorLasa Larrea, Bertaes_ES
dc.creatorSantamaría, Enriquees_ES
dc.creatorAparicio Tejo, Pedro Maríaes_ES
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-22T07:53:18Z
dc.date.available2020-09-22T07:53:18Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn1460-2431
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2454/38217
dc.description.abstractAccessing different nitrogen (N) sources involves a profound adaptation of plant metabolism. In this study, a quantitative proteomic approach was used to further understand how the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana adjusts to different N sources when grown exclusively under nitrate or ammonium nutrition. Proteome data evidenced that glucosinolate metabolism was differentially regulated by the N source and that both TGG1 and TGG2 myrosinases were more abundant under ammonium nutrition, which is generally considered to be a stressful situation. Moreover, Arabidopsis plants displayed glucosinolate accumulation and induced myrosinase activity under ammonium nutrition. Interestingly, these results were also confirmed in the economically important crop broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica). Moreover, these metabolic changes were correlated in Arabidopsis with the differential expression of genes from the aliphatic glucosinolate metabolic pathway. This study underlines the importance of nitrogen nutrition and the potential of using ammonium as the N source in order to stimulate glucosinolate metabolism, which may have important applications not only in terms of reducing pesticide use, but also for increasing plants’ nutritional value.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was financially supported by the Basque Government (IT932-16), the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness (AGL2015-64582-C3-1-R and BIO2014-56271-R co-funded by FEDER), and the People Programme (Marie Curie Actions) of the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007–2013) under REA grant agreement number 334019. Navarrabiomed Proteomics Unit is a member of ProteoRed, PRB2-ISCIII, and is supported by grant PT13/0001, of the PE I+D+I 2013-2016 funded by ISCIII and FEDER.en
dc.format.extent11 p.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Experimental Botany, 2016, 67(11), 3313-3323en
dc.rights© The Author 2016. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
dc.subjectAmmoniumen
dc.subjectArabidopsis thalianaen
dc.subjectBroccolien
dc.subjectGlucosinolatesen
dc.subjectMyrosinaseen
dc.subjectNitrateen
dc.subjectNitrogen nutritionen
dc.subjectProteomicsen
dc.titleQuantitative proteomics reveals the importance of nitrogen source to control glucosinolate metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica oleraceaen
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articleen
dc.typeArtículo / Artikuluaes
dc.contributor.departmentUniversidad Pública de Navarra. Departamento de Ciencias del Medio Naturales_ES
dc.contributor.departmentNafarroako Unibertsitate Publikoa. Natura Ingurunearen Zientziak Sailaeu
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen
dc.rights.accessRightsAcceso abierto / Sarbide irekiaes
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/jxb/erw147
dc.relation.projectIDinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/ES/1PE/AGL2015-64582en
dc.relation.projectIDinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/ES/1PE/BIO2014-56271-Ren
dc.relation.projectIDinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/FP7/334019en
dc.relation.publisherversionhttps://doi.org/10.1093/jxb/erw147
dc.type.versioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersionen
dc.type.versionVersión publicada / Argitaratu den bertsioaes


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

© The Author 2016. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License,
which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © The Author 2016. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.