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dc.creatorBossavit, Benoîtes_ES
dc.creatorParsons, Sarahes_ES
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-15T11:31:34Z
dc.date.available2020-10-15T11:31:34Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.issn2398-6263
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2454/38409
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate how teenagers on the autism spectrum respond to their involvement in the creation of a collaborative game, meeting the curriculum requirements in programming at secondary level in England. Design/methodology/approach: Two autistic teenagers were involved in participatory design processes to elaborate and develop together a collaborative game of their choice using the visual programming software, Kodu Game Lab. Findings: With the support of adults (teachers and the researcher), the participants were able to demonstrate and strengthen their participation, problem-solving and programming skills. The participants expressed their preferences through their attitudes towards the tasks. They created a game where the players did not need to initiate any interaction between each other to complete a level. Furthermore, the students naturally decided to work separately and interacted more with the adults than with each other. This is a small case study and so cannot be generalised. However, it can serve as starting point for further studies that involve students with autism in the development of interactive games. Practical implications: It has been shown that disengaged students can develop various skills through their involvement in software programming. Originality/value: Overall, this paper presents the involvement of teenagers on the autism spectrum in the initial design and development of a collaborative game with an approach that shaped, and was shaped by, the students’ interests. Although collaboration was emphasised in the intended learning outcomes for the game, as well as through the design process, this proved difficult to achieve in practice suggesting that students with autism may require stronger scaffolding to engage in collaborative learning.en
dc.format.extent29 p.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.publisherEmeralden
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Enabling Technologies, 2017, 11(2), 31-42en
dc.rights© 2017, Emerald Publishing Limiteden
dc.subjectGame designen
dc.subjectCollaborative gameen
dc.subjectAutismen
dc.subjectKoduen
dc.subjectStudent voiceen
dc.subjectParticipatory designen
dc.titleFrom start to finish: teenagers on the autism spectrum developing their own collaborative gameen
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articleen
dc.typeArtículo / Artikuluaes
dc.contributor.departmentUniversidad Pública de Navarra. Departamento de Ingeniería Matemática e Informáticaes_ES
dc.contributor.departmentNafarroako Unibertsitate Publikoa. Matematika eta Informatika Ingeniaritza Sailaeu
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen
dc.rights.accessRightsAcceso abierto / Sarbide irekiaes
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/JET-02-2017-0004
dc.relation.publisherversionhttps://doi.org/10.1108/JET-02-2017-0004
dc.type.versioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/acceptedVersionen
dc.type.versionVersión aceptada / Onetsi den bertsioaes


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