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dc.creatorMcKee, Grace B.es_ES
dc.creatorOlabarrieta Landa, Laienees_ES
dc.creatorPérez Delgadillo, Paula K.es_ES
dc.creatorValdivia Tangarife, Ricardoes_ES
dc.creatorVillaseñor Cabrera, Teresitaes_ES
dc.creatorRamos Usuga, Danielaes_ES
dc.creatorPerrin, Paul B.es_ES
dc.creatorArango Lasprilla, Juan Carloses_ES
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-21T10:03:29Z
dc.date.available2021-06-21T10:03:29Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn1661-7827
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2454/39993
dc.description.abstractPediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) represents a serious public health concern. Family members are often caregivers for children with TBI, which can result in a significant strain on familial relationships. Research is needed to examine aspects of family functioning in the context of recovery post-TBI, especially in Latin America, where cultural norms may reinforce caregiving by family members, but where resources for these caregivers may be scarce. This study examined caregiver-reported family satisfaction, communication, cohesion, and flexibility at three time points in the year post-injury for 46 families of a child with TBI in comparison to healthy control families. Families experiencing pediatric TBI were recruited from a large hospital in Guadalajara, Mexico, while healthy controls were recruited from a local educational center. Results from multilevel growth curve models demonstrated that caregivers of children with a TBI reported significantly worse family functioning than controls at each assessment. Families experiencing pediatric TBI were unable to attain the level of functioning of controls during the time span studied, suggesting that these families are likely to experience long-term disruptions in family functioning. The current study highlights the need for family-level intervention programs to target functioning for families affected by pediatric TBI who are at risk for difficulties within a rehabilitation context.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was supported by the Department of Veterans Affairs Office of Academic Affiliations Advanced Fellowship Program in Mental Illness Research and Treatment, the Medical Research Service of the Veterans Affairs Central Virginia Health Care System, and the Department of Veterans Affairs Mid-Atlantic Mental Illness Research, Education, and Clinical Center (MIRECC). Ramos-Usuga, D. was supported by a predoctoral fellowship from the Basque Government (PRE_2019_1_0164).en
dc.format.extent12 p.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.publisherMDPIen
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 2020, 17(22), 8508en
dc.rights© 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license.en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectFamily caregiversen
dc.subjectFamily functioningen
dc.subjectLatin Americaen
dc.subjectPediatric TBIen
dc.subjectTraumatic brain injury (TBI)en
dc.titleLongitudinal growth curve trajectories of family dynamics after pediatric traumatic brain injury in Mexicoen
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articleen
dc.typeArtículo / Artikuluaes
dc.contributor.departmentUniversidad Pública de Navarra. Departamento de Ciencias de la Saludes_ES
dc.contributor.departmentNafarroako Unibertsitate Publikoa. Osasun Zientziak Sailaeu
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen
dc.rights.accessRightsAcceso abierto / Sarbide irekiaes
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/ijerph17228508
dc.relation.publisherversionhttps://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17228508
dc.type.versioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersionen
dc.type.versionVersión publicada / Argitaratu den bertsioaes


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© 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license.