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dc.creatorCamarero, Luises_ES
dc.creatorOliva Serrano, Jesúses_ES
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-05T12:00:17Z
dc.date.available2020-03-05T12:00:17Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn2055-1045
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2454/36425
dc.description.abstractThe impact of the global financial crisis and the economic recession on Southern European countries has threatened the rural welfare of many regions. The loss by emigration of the young population, austerity policies, and the territorial concentration of essential services have led many of rural areas into a spiral of decline. The growth of regional disparities, even among rural areas, is confirmed by the European official reports. Depopulation and rural decline are highly associated with remoteness. Accessibility is one key issue to mitigating this erosion of socio-territorial cohesion; another is mobility, which is the usual way to confront the scarce opportunities and limited services in deeply rural territories. This paper pays attention to socio-territorial inequalities and considers as working hypothesis that social rights are differentiated by the habitat structure; as a result, territory determines different degrees of citizenship. Traditional perspectives focused on the access to productive resources and material opportunities as the source of disadvantages, but we suggest that a more comprehensive approach is needed to address the rural gap: the difference between living conditions and living expectations in rural areas in contrast with urban ones. We address two main processes involved on it. On the one hand, there are strong interconnections between physical and social mobility, such as commuting to distant labor markets and educative centers, which could increase the social mobility of rural youth. On the other hand, the maps of the provision of services, infrastructures networks and investments not only reshape the territories but also their sociological morphologies. Accessibility and mobility are strongly linked with rural well-being and social sustainability. We explore and illustrate these questions with examples from the Spanish case. The text is structured into four issues regarding the rural gap: the territorial imbalance and social cohesion, the demographic imbalance and rural welfare as the product of the inter-generational equilibrium, the rural disparities in accessibility and the challenges of mobility transition. Finally, we conclude with a discussion of the rural policies and governance required for achieving social and territorial balance.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis paper has been funded by the Spanish Plan for Scientific Research through the research projects: 'Mobilities, Social Diversity and Sustainability-CSO2012-52862' (2012-2016) and 'Socio-spatial Research and Rural Development Network. Iso-Rural-CSO2016-81728-REDT'(2016-2019).en
dc.format.extent7 p.
dc.language.isoengen
dc.publisherPalgrave Macmillanen
dc.relation.ispartofPalgrave Communications, (2019) 5:95en
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2019. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder.en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectRural mobilityen
dc.subjectAccessibilityen
dc.subjectSocial inequalitiesen
dc.titleThinking in rural gap: mobility and social inequalitiesen
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articleen
dc.typeArtículo / Artikuluaes
dc.contributor.departmentUniversidad Pública de Navarra. Departamento de Sociología y Trabajo Sociales_ES
dc.contributor.departmentNafarroako Unibertsitate Publikoa. Soziologia eta Gizarte Lana Sailaeu
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen
dc.rights.accessRightsAcceso abierto / Sarbide irekiaes
dc.identifier.doi10.1057/s41599-019-0306-x
dc.relation.projectIDinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/ES/1PE/CSO2012-52862en
dc.relation.projectIDinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/ES/1PE/CSO2016-81728en
dc.relation.publisherversionhttps://doi.org/10.1057/s41599-019-0306-x
dc.type.versioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersionen
dc.type.versionVersión publicada / Argitaratu den bertsioaes


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© The Author(s) 2019. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons
Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing,
adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give
appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative
Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party
material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless
indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the
article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory
regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from
the copyright holder.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © The Author(s) 2019. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder.